Knitting the Stash - Part 2 - Fingering Weight Odds and Ends

Monday, October 15, 2018

Knitting the Stash - Part 2 – Fingering Weight Odds & Ends

I’ve been hard at work using more stash and this time I set my sights on my fingering weight. While it would be incredible to make socks and shawls with all of this yarn…

I crunched the numbers and realized that as I accumulate more and more shawl and sock yarn, I need to allot that much more time to knitting said yarn. Makes sense, right? However, the number of people I’d actually knit socks for fluctuates between 3 and 1 depending on my mood and the number of times I wear a shawl per week is less than once…

so… what to do with all of that sock and shawl yarn?!

With birthdays coming up for my kiddo’s buddies, I decided to knit up a few of my Basic Children’s Ponchos using doubled fingering as a worsted weight. Doubling the yarn means the projects go a bit more quickly AND I get to ply colors and play a bit with fading colors and creating a really custom look.

Poncho #1:

Here’s the before photo, as I was planning what colors to use.

Here’s this sweet little poncho, finished!

 

Poncho #2:

Here’s the before photo, as I was planning what colors to use.

Here’s the amazing rainbow poncho, finished!!

 

I adjusted my original pattern because these ponchos are intended for toddlers rather than children:

  • I used a size 8 needle instead of a 9 to make the poncho a little smaller.
  • I wanted the neck to fit a little more snugly, so I cast on 68 instead of 72 and worked the rolled neck. After the purl round, I increased to the 72 and placed my markers according to the pattern.
  • The ponchos were worked to about 13” for the 2-year olds.
  • I held fingering weight double stranded, as mentioned above. To keep the ponchos from looking too striped (I wanted more of an ombré look), I would only switch out one strand of yarn at a time. Let’s say I was knitting with two strands of color A. I would work that up and then cut one strand out and add one strand of color B. Then I used A & B held together. When I was ready to change, I cut color A and added in a second strand of color B.  

Working the colors this way allowed me to use every last drop of the smaller balls, it also meant I didn’t have to weave in four tails in one spot. I’d only have two tails – one from the color that was cut and one from the color that was added in. The color that didn’t change didn’t need to be cut. Save yourself a little work!!

Sometimes my color shifts worked in this way:

AA

AB

BB

BC

CD (Check it out! I went right from a strand of B to a strand of D… but since C has remained the constant, I still have a color change that doesn’t look too abrupt)

DD

DE

etc...... 


Stay tuned to see an EASY PEASY cowl that uses the same color shifting techniques with double stranded fingering weight AND the very cozy hats I’ve been knitting up on my knitting machine with fingering weight yarn.

Comments

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
To help us prevent spam, please prove you're human by typing the words you see here.